STORY

Barney’s ruins is an old Irish Clachan located in the most tranquil corner of Patricks family farm, the very heart of the historic townland known as “Gortinure”.

The Clachan consists of a cottage, slowly extended over time with an adjacent small outbuilding. A horse and cart laneway runs through the middle of the clachan. People would have once stopped in for a ceilidh whilst trans versing on route to other houses in the area and to mass on Sundays in Granaghan Church, Swatragh, centuries ago.

The original cottage dates back to 1830 and was last lived in by Patricks great-great uncle Bernard, who everyone locally named ‘Barney’.

Searching through records we have since discovered that he was a tenant farmer, likely farming grass seed with a few cattle. At the time there were a number of landlords who had thousands of acres rented out to small peasant, tenant farmers, like Barney.

In the 1880s’ landlords and tenant farmers went through what can be described as very interesting times. The tenant farmers held massive demonstrations throughout Ireland in order to try and obtain the land back into their possession from the landlords who treated them poorly. After many years of demonstrations, William Gladstone, prime minister at the time was the first to issue a land reform which paved the way for a small farmer like Barney to own his property.

The farm has been passed down through the generations of the Bradley family since its original title owner, great-great uncle Barney. As he was never married or had any children he passed it onto his brother Laurence, who then passed it onto Patrick’s grandfather Bernard, who finally passed it onto Patrick’s father James, who to this day holds the title.

Since the last time the cottage was lived in, over a century ago, it has deteriorated and fallen into ruins, and being the only physical evidence of who the original Barney is or was, Patrick and his father James, decided to take upon the ambitious challenge of bringing the clachan back to life to keep the legacy of great-great uncle Barney alive.

Patrick an award-winning architect, wanted to design an iconic piece of architecture, that fully respected the ruins and the legacy of the site. The concept was to construct a new cottage, a minimal piece of contemporary architecture, that floats elegantly over the old cottage ruins below and at night is illuminated like a dazzling nocturnal installation. Patrick’s vision for the adjacent barn, once the winter home of the resident farm bull named “Barney” called after great-great uncle Barney, was to restore and convert the barn with a modern twist, where both the old and new would seamlessly juxtapose, creating a small, yet unique barn conversion.

Planning for the project began in 2019, with construction beginning in the June of 2022 and completed in November 2022.

Barney’s ruins is an Irish Clachan like no other, a place to relax and unwind, in a magical and beautiful rural farm setting.

STORY

Barney’s ruins is an old Irish Clachan located in the most tranquil corner of Patricks family farm, the very heart of the historic townland known as “Gortinure”.

The Clachan consists of a cottage, slowly extended over time with an adjacent small outbuilding. A horse and cart laneway runs through the middle of the clachan. People would have once stopped in for a ceilidh whilst trans versing on route to other houses in the area and to mass on Sundays in Granaghan Church, Swatragh, centuries ago.

The original cottage dates back to 1830 and was last lived in by Patricks great-great uncle Bernard, who everyone locally named ‘Barney’.

Searching through records we have since discovered that he was a tenant farmer, likely farming grass seed with a few cattle. At the time there were a number of landlords who had thousands of acres rented out to small peasant, tenant farmers, like Barney.

In the 1880s’ landlords and tenant farmers went through what can be described as very interesting times. The tenant farmers held massive demonstrations throughout Ireland in order to try and obtain the land back into their possession from the landlords who treated them poorly. After many years of demonstrations, William Gladstone, prime minister at the time was the first to issue a land reform which paved the way for a small farmer like Barney to own his property.

The farm has been passed down through the generations of the Bradley family since its original title owner, great-great uncle Barney. As he was never married or had any children he passed it onto his brother Laurence, who then passed it onto Patrick’s grandfather Bernard, who finally passed it onto Patrick’s father James, who to this day holds the title.

Since the last time the cottage was lived in, over a century ago, it has deteriorated and fallen into ruins, and being the only physical evidence of who the original Barney is or was, Patrick and his father James, decided to take upon the ambitious challenge of bringing the clachan back to life to keep the legacy of great-great uncle Barney alive.

Patrick an award-winning architect, wanted to design an iconic piece of architecture, that fully respected the ruins and the legacy of the site. The concept was to construct a new cottage, a minimal piece of contemporary architecture, that floats elegantly over the old cottage ruins below and at night is illuminated like a dazzling nocturnal installation. Patrick’s vision for the adjacent barn, once the winter home of the resident farm bull named “Barney” called after great-great uncle Barney, was to restore and convert the barn with a modern twist, where both the old and new would seamlessly juxtapose, creating a small, yet unique barn conversion.

Planning for the project began in 2019, with construction beginning in the June of 2022 and completed in November 2022.

Barney’s ruins is an Irish Clachan like no other, a place to relax and unwind, in a magical and beautiful rural farm setting.